I’d wondered before about your feelings on getting tatted up, and it’s still one of my most searched posts.  The other day, I was sitting and chatting with one of my best gals, Cat, and we noticed that all of the young starlets and songstresses were using ink as their best accessories.  And I can’t lie, I think a lot of them look really cool, but having one tattoo of my own that’s not visible to the general public (sorry, Dad- cat’s outta the bag), I can imagine regretting a more substantial stain of the skin.  Call me a commitmentphobe.

The thought of having to explain to little Tommy why his mom has an explicit phrase emblazoned on her forearm, makes me cringe.  And let’s not even get into that thing called gravity.  A cute little fish on your bum may some day become a whale on the back of your knee caps.  But that hasn’t seemed to slow down the beautiful people from Beverly Hills to the Big Apple.  Hollywood’s biggest stars from the queen of twerk to leading lady of the runway are expressing themselves in a dermal way- one of which is having hers removed due to a type-o.  Whoops.

So, we decided we were going to go ahead and get ourselves some henna fakies.  And then I saw a status update regarding a little something called jagua.  Inquiring minds had to know.  I went ahead and fired up, good ol’ Google.  Wouldn’t you know, I could order an at home kit and create my very own temporary tattoos.  And order I did.  Thanks to Amazon.com, I received my DIY kit within a couple of days and I couldn’t wait to test it out.  One fine fall evening, we headed up to the roof and started to draw all over each other.  We began by testing the pre-made designs, but our creative geniuses (and that liter of wine) got the best of us and we went free hand.  From hashtags to this little reminder I painted on my forearm, we went wild.  Take that, Miley.

While we had taken the time to read the directions (a novel idea for me), we didn’t really take them as seriously as we should have.  Trust me, there’s a reason they include a pair of latex gloves.  Not only did we awake with hangovers, we also had stained fingers and smudged designs.  When the directions said to let it dry, they meant it.  Anything we’d wiped or tried to correct appeared the next day.  A bit of scrubbing and some patience erased our mistakes, but true to promise, the art will stay on for a solid two weeks.  Verdict?  A great way to test out a tat, but be sure to not drink and ink.

xx,

WhyDid